'Stuff is Always'

An experiment in socialization, procrastination and beyond
Happy birthday to my amazing sister!

Happy birthday to my amazing sister!

It’s been more than a month since I Tumbled anything, so I’d better make this good. Umm…

Here’s an amazingly weird funked-out jam by the guy who did “King Fu Fighting” all about an ultra-bloody and dark minor classic from the Vincent Price filmography?

Yeah, that’s the stuff.

About last night…

I’ll just say this one thing about The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences/ The Oscars:

The rules regarding screenplays need to be changed, desperately. Ethan Hawke, Julie Delpy and Richard Linklater’s pitch-perfect, lovely and heartbreaking screenplay to “Before Midnight” was one of the best uses of language I’ve heard all year (that includes film, music, theater, television, literature.) It deserved to be recognized.

However, due to some arcane and not terribly well thought out rules, “Before Midnight” was nominated in the Best Adapted Screenplay category. It was deemed an adaptation because the category considers all sequels to be adaptations. This classification is due to the fact that they’re picking up on story threads established in previous pieces of work, I guess. Yet, David O. Russell and Eric Warren Singer’s screenplay to “American Hustle,” which was based on (or, one could say, adapted from) real life, was nominated for Best Original Screenplay. How does that make any kind of sense?

Now, don’t get me wrong. I have no problem with “12 Years a Slave” winning the Best Adapted Screenplay Oscar. I haven’t seen the film, so I can’t judge it. But, it was adapted from a memoir written by the true life equivalent of the film’s main character so, yes, it was a true adapted screenplay.

But still, “Before Midnight” got shafted. And this isn’t the first time this has happened, either. In 2004, the film that preceded “Before Midnight,” “Before Sunset,” was nominated in the Best Adapted Screenplay category, where it lost to “Sideways” (itself based on a book).

Sharon Van Etten taped an episode of “Pioneering,” the AV Club’s upcoming web series, at the Stone Pony this afternoon, and covered the Boss while she was at it!Check out my recap here.

Sharon Van Etten taped an episode of “Pioneering,” the AV Club’s upcoming web series, at the Stone Pony this afternoon, and covered the Boss while she was at it!

Check out my recap here.

I watched Ben Whetley’s “A Field in England” last night. I’ll write up a more extensive review once I pick my brains up off the floor. But all in all, I greatly admire it, even if I wouldn’t go so far as to say I like it. Then again, I don’t think this is necessarily a film that’s asking to be liked.

I watched Ben Whetley’s “A Field in England” last night. I’ll write up a more extensive review once I pick my brains up off the floor. But all in all, I greatly admire it, even if I wouldn’t go so far as to say I like it. Then again, I don’t think this is necessarily a film that’s asking to be liked.

I had the grand pleasure of seeing Careena Melia and company in Julia Campanelli’s production of “Macbeth” last night. Here’s my review.

Short version: if you’re a fan of the Bard, the Scottish play, Sleep No More, any of the folks involved or live theater in general, see this now. It plays through Thursday, then it’s gone. 

I sum up my thoughts in a spoiler-free way in my review, but a few more remarks: I love how bare-bones this production is. When you have these actors, these words, this story, you really don’t need much. Gone are the magic tricks of the Teller version, the jiggling dagger on fishing wire Branagh saw before him, the dubstep double double of Patrick Stewart’s (all elements I enjoyed in their own context, for the most part). That being said, Campanelli wisely let the cast and the words do the heavy lifting, and the results remind you why you fell in love with this show in the first place.

That being said, there were so many elements that activated the raised-Catholic centers of my brain. I won’t spoil them here in case you’re going (and you should!) but the incense? Jesus, that brought me back.

And I’m pretty sure this doesn’t need to be said, but I’ll say it anyway: the part of Lady Macbeth? It’s Careena’s now. Hands down, it’s hers. No one can touch her. Not by a mile.

For any of my fellow Tumbr-ers out there who have seen the show so far, what did you think?

35 tracks containing my favorite musical moments from Morrissey and the Smiths. Two hours of bouncy English sadness!

(Source: Spotify)

This is happening. Careena Melia and Kelly Bartnik are returning to the world of the Scottish Play. It’s for four nights only, and my lovely wife and I will be at one of them. Something wicked this way comes…